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  Dynamic causal modeling suggests serial processing of tactile vibratory stimuli in the human somatosensory cortex: An fMRI study

Kalberlah, C., Villringer, A., & Pleger, B. (2013). Dynamic causal modeling suggests serial processing of tactile vibratory stimuli in the human somatosensory cortex: An fMRI study. NeuroImage, 74, 164-171. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.02.018.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B1A9-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8579-F
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kalberlah, Christian1, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 2, 3, Author              
Pleger, Burkhard1, 2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Human primary somatosensory cortex; Human secondary somatosensory cortex; Effective connectivity; Dynamic causal modeling
 Abstract: Sensitivity to location and frequency of tactile stimuli is a characterizing feature of human primary (S1), and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortices. Recent evidence suggests that S1 is predominantly receptive to stimulus location, while S2 is attuned to stimulus frequency. Although it is well established in humans that tactile frequency information is relayed serially from S1 to S2, a recent study, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in combination with dynamic causal modeling (DCM), suggested that somatosensory inputs are processed in parallel in S1 and S2. In the present fMRI/DCM study, we revisited this controversy and investigated the specialization of the human somatosensory cortical areas with regard to tactile stimulus representations, as well as their effective connectivity. During brain imaging, 14 participants performed a somatosensory discrimination task on vibrotactile stimuli. Importantly, the model space for DCM was chosen to allow for direct inference on the question of interest by systematically varying the information transmission from pure parallel to pure serial implementations. Bayesian model comparison on the level of model families strongly favors a serial, instead of a parallel processing route for tactile stimulus information along the somatosensory pathway. Our fMRI/DCM data thus support previous suggestions of a sequential information transmission from S1 to S2 in humans.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-06-052013-02-122013-02-192013-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.02.018
PMID: 23435215
Other: Epub 2013
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 74 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 164 - 171 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166