English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Automatic processing of political preferences in the human brain

Tusche, A., Kahnt, T., Wisniewski, D., & Haynes, J.-D. (2013). Automatic processing of political preferences in the human brain. NeuroImage, 72, 174-182. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.01.020.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B359-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8406-1
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Tusche_2013_Automatic.pdf (Publisher version), 804KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Tusche_2013_Automatic.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Tusche, Anita1, 2, 3, Author              
Kahnt, Thorsten2, 3, 4, 5, Author
Wisniewski, David2, 3, 5, Author
Haynes, John-Dylan1, 2, 3, 5, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634548              
2Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Berlin, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Berlin Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Laboratory for Social and Neural Systems Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
5Graduate School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Excellence Cluster NeuroCure, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Political preferences; Preference-based decision-making; Donations; Automatic valuation; fMRI
 Abstract: Individual political preferences as expressed, for instance, in votes or donations are fundamental to democratic societies. However, the relevance of deliberative processing for political preferences has been highly debated, putting automatic processes in the focus of attention. Based on this notion, the present study tested whether brain responses reflect participants' preferences for politicians and their associated political parties in the absence of explicit deliberation and attention. Participants were instructed to perform a demanding visual fixation task while their brain responses were measured using fMRI. Occasionally, task-irrelevant images of German politicians from two major competing parties were presented in the background while the distraction task was continued. Subsequent to scanning, participants' political preferences for these politicians and their affiliated parties were obtained. Brain responses in distinct brain areas predicted automatic political preferences at the different levels of abstraction: activation in the ventral striatum was positively correlated with preference ranks for unattended politicians, whereas participants' preferences for the affiliated political parties were reflected in activity in the insula and the cingulate cortex. Using an additional donation task, we showed that the automatic preference-related processing in the brain extended to real-world behavior that involved actual financial loss to participants. Together, these findings indicate that brain responses triggered by unattended and task-irrelevant political images reflect individual political preferences at different levels of abstraction.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-01-152013-01-242013-05-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.01.020
PMID: 23353599
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 72 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 174 - 182 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166