English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Distributed representations of rule identity and rule order in human frontal cortex and striatum

Reverberi, C., Görgen, K., & Haynes, J.-D. (2012). Distributed representations of rule identity and rule order in human frontal cortex and striatum. The Journal of Neuroscience, 32(48), 17420-17430. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2344-12.2012.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B5F8-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FC1A-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Reverberi_2012_Distributed.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Reverberi_2012_Distributed.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Reverberi, Carlo1, 2, Author
Görgen, Kai1, Author
Haynes, John-Dylan1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2University of Milano–Bicocca, Milan, Italy, ou_persistent22              
3MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634548              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Humans are able to flexibly devise and implement rules to reach their desired goals. For simple situations, we can use single rules, such as “if traffic light is green then cross the street.” In most cases, however, more complex rule sets are required, involving the integration of multiple layers of control. Although it has been shown that prefrontal cortex is important for rule representation, it has remained unclear how the brain encodes more complex rule sets. Here, we investigate how the brain represents the order in which different parts of a rule set are evaluated. Participants had to follow compound rule sets that involved the concurrent application of two single rules in a specific order, where one of the rules always had to be evaluated first. The rules and their assigned order were independently manipulated. By applying multivariate decoding to fMRI data, we found that the identity of the current rule was encoded in a frontostriatal network involving right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, right superior frontal gyrus, and dorsal striatum. In contrast, rule order could be decoded in the dorsal striatum and in the right premotor cortex. The nonhomogeneous distribution of information across brain areas was confirmed by follow-up analyses focused on relevant regions of interest. We argue that the brain encodes complex rule sets by “decomposing” them in their constituent features, which are represented in different brain areas, according to the aspect of information to be maintained.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-09-232012-11-28
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2344-12.2012
PMID: 23197733
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: The Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : J. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Baltimore, MD : The Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 32 (48) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 17420 - 17430 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925502187