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  The fuzzy brain: Vagueness and mapping connectivity of the human cerebral cortex

Haueis, P. (2012). The fuzzy brain: Vagueness and mapping connectivity of the human cerebral cortex. Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, 6: 37. doi:10.3389/fnana.2012.00037.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B64F-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FA02-1
Genre: Journal Article

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Haueis_2012_Fuzzy.pdf (Publisher version), 598KB
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 Creators:
Haueis, Philipp1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_1356546              

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Free keywords: Connectivity; Cytoarchitectonics; Fuzzy boundaries; Neuroanatomy; Statistical thresholding; Vagueness
 Abstract: While the past century of neuroscientific research has brought considerable progress in defining the boundaries of the human cerebral cortex, there are cases in which the demarcation of one area from another remains fuzzy. Despite the existence of clearly demarcated areas, examples of gradual transitions between areas are known since early cytoarchitectonic studies. Since multi-modal anatomical approaches and functional connectivity studies brought renewed attention to the topic, a better understanding of the theoretical and methodological implications of fuzzy boundaries in brain science can be conceptually useful. This article provides a preliminary conceptual framework to understand this problem by applying philosophical theories of vagueness to three levels of neuroanatomical research. For the first two levels (cytoarchitectonics and fMRI studies), vagueness will be distinguished from other forms of uncertainty, such as imprecise measurement or ambiguous causal sources of activation. The article proceeds to discuss the implications of these levels for the anatomical study of connectivity between cortical areas. There, vagueness gets imported into connectivity studies since the network structure is dependent on the parcellation scheme and thresholds have to be used to delineate functional boundaries. Functional connectivity may introduce an additional form of vagueness, as it is an organizational principle of the brain. The article concludes by discussing what steps are appropriate to define areal boundaries more precisely.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-05-022012-08-152012-09-05
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnana.2012.00037
PMID: 22973199
PMC: PMC3433728
Other: eCollection 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
  Abbreviation : Front Neuroanat
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 37 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5129
CoNE: /journals/resource/1662-5129