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  The role of appearance and motion in action prediction

Saygin, A. P., & Stadler, W. (2012). The role of appearance and motion in action prediction. Psychological Research, 76(4), 388-394. doi:10.1007/s00426-012-0426-z.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B72A-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FC11-E
Genre: Journal Article

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Ayse_2012_Role.pdf (Publisher version), 265KB
 
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 Creators:
Saygin, Ayse Pinar1, Author
Stadler, Waltraud2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
3Department of Sport and Health Science, TU Munich, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: We used a novel stimulus set of human and robot actions to explore the role of humanlike appearance and motion in action prediction. Participants viewed videos of familiar actions performed by three agents: human, android and robot, the former two sharing human appearance, the latter two nonhuman motion. In each trial, the video was occluded for 400 ms. Participants were asked to determine whether the action continued coherently (in-time) after occlusion. The timing at which the action continued was early, late, or in-time (100, 700 or 400 ms after the start of occlusion). Task performance interacted with the observed agent. For early continuations, accuracy was highest for human, lowest for robot actions. For late continuations, the pattern was reversed. Both android and human conditions differed significantly from the robot condition. Given the robot and android conditions had the same kinematics, the visual form of the actor appears to affect action prediction. We suggest that the selection of the internal sensorimotor model used for action prediction is influenced by the observed agent’s appearance.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-07-172012-02-092012-02-282012-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00426-012-0426-z
PMID: 22371203
Other: Epub 2012
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Title: Psychological Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Berlin : Springer-Verlag
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 76 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 388 - 394 Identifier: ISSN: 0340-0727
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925518603_1