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  Similarity and number of alternatives in the random-dot motion paradigm

van Maanen, L., Grasman, R. P. P. P., Forstmann, B. U., Keuken, M. C., Brown, S. D., & Wagenmakers, E. J. (2012). Similarity and number of alternatives in the random-dot motion paradigm. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 74(4), 739-753. doi:10.3758/s13414-011-0267-7.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B7B4-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FC0A-7
Genre: Journal Article

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Maanen_2012_Similarity.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
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 Creators:
van Maanen, Leendert1, 2, Author
Grasman, Raoul P. P. P.1, Author
Forstmann, Birte U.1, Author              
Keuken, Max C.1, Author
Brown, Scott D.3, Author
Wagenmakers, Eric Jan1, Author
Affiliations:
1University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Cognitive Science Center Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Bayesian modeling; Decision making; Response time models
 Abstract: The popular random-dot motion (RDM) task has recently been applied to multiple-choice perceptual decision-making. However, changes in the number of alternatives on an RDM display lead to changes in the similarity between the alternatives, complicating the study of multiple-choice effects. To disentangle the effects of similarity and number of alternatives, we analyzed behavior in the RDM task using an optimal-observer model. The model applies Bayesian principles to give an account of how changes in the stimulus influence the decision-making process. A possible neural implementation of the optimal-observer model is discussed, and we provide behavioral data that support the model. We verify the predictions from the optimal-observer model by fitting a descriptive model of choice behavior (the linear ballistic accumulator model) to the behavioral data. The results show that (a) there is a natural interaction in the RDM task between similarity and the number of alternatives; (b) the number of alternatives influences “response caution”, whereas the similarity between the alternatives influences “drift rate”; and (c) decisions in the RDM task are near optimal when participants are presented with multiple alternatives.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-01-282012-05-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3758/s13414-011-0267-7
PMID: 22287207
PMC: PMC3310993
 Degree: -

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Title: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
  Abbreviation : Atten Percept Psychophys
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Psychonomic Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 74 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 739 - 753 Identifier: ISSN: 1943-3921
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1943-3921