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  Action effect anticipation: Neurophysiological basis and functional consequences

Waszak, F., Cardoso-Leite, P., & Hughes, G. (2012). Action effect anticipation: Neurophysiological basis and functional consequences. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 36(2), 943-959. doi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2011.11.004.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B8E4-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-F9FA-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Waszak, Florian1, 2, Author
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro3, Author              
Hughes, Gethin1, 2, Author
Affiliations:
1Université Paris-Sorbonne, France, ou_persistent22              
2Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France, ou_persistent22              
3Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634558              

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Free keywords: Effect anticipation; Ideomotor action; Sensory suppression; Imagery; Repetition suppression
 Abstract: Voluntary actions are thought to be selected with respect to their intended goal. Converging data suggests that medial frontal cortex plays a crucial role in linking actions to their predicted effects. Recent neuroimaging data also suggests that during action selection, the brain pre-activities the representation of the predicted action effect. We review evidence of action effect prediction, both in terms of its neurophysiological basis as well as its functional consequences. By assuming that action preparation includes activation of the predicted sensory consequences of the action, we provide a mechanism to understand sensory attenuation and intentional binding. In this account, sensory attenuation results from more difficult discrimination between the observed action effect and the pre-activation of the predicted effect, as compared to when no (or incorrect) prediction is present. Similarly, a predicted action effect should also reach the threshold of awareness faster (intentional binding), if its perceptual representation is pre-activated. By comparing this potential mechanism to mental imagery and repetition suppression we propose a possible neural basis for the processing of predicted action effects.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-09-232011-06-242011-11-072012-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2011.11.004
PMID: 22108008
Other: Epub 2011
 Degree: -

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Title: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York [etc.] : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 36 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 943 - 959 Identifier: ISSN: 0149-7634
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954928536106