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  Escaping the here and now: Evidence for a role of the default mode network in perceptually decoupled thought

Smallwood, J., Tipper, C., Brown, K., Baird, B., Engen, H., Michaels, J. R., et al. (2013). Escaping the here and now: Evidence for a role of the default mode network in perceptually decoupled thought. NeuroImage, 69, 120-125. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.12.012.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B944-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-83F5-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Smallwood, Jonathan1, Author              
Tipper, Christine2, Author
Brown, Kevin3, Author
Baird, Benjamin2, Author
Engen, Haakon1, Author              
Michaels, Joseph R.2, Author
Grafton, Scott2, Author
Schooler, Jonathan W.2, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Absent-minded lapses; Daydreaming; Default mode network; Medial prefrontal cortex; Posterior cingulate; Mind-wandering; Response time; Stimulus-independent thought
 Abstract: Cognition that is not based on perception can lead to at least two different outcomes. In some situations, cognition that is independent of perception can allow actions to be selected other than those prescribed by immediate perceptual input. In others, cognition can be independent of perception and unrelated to the current behavioral goal allowing thoughts to develop that are largely independent of the actions involved in an external task. The default mode network (DMN) has been implicated in both of these kinds of perceptually decoupled thought. The current experiment used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether a common region of this network was co-activated by both of these states. Both the medial pre-frontal cortex and the posterior cingulate – two major hubs of the DMN – showed greater activity when (i) actions that did not depend upon immediate perceptual input were faster and (ii) when actions based on perceptual input were slower. Together these data suggest that the DMN is important in cognition that is independent from perceptual input regardless of whether such thoughts result in action, or, instead compete with the behavioral goals of the moment.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-12-082012-12-202013-04-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.12.012
PMID: 23261640
Other: Epub 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 69 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 120 - 125 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166