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  Glycoproteins as targets of autoantibodies in CNS inflammation: MOG and more

Mayer, M. C., & Meinl, E. (2012). Glycoproteins as targets of autoantibodies in CNS inflammation: MOG and more. Therapeutic Advances in Neurological Disorders, 5(3), 147-159. doi:10.1177/ 1756285611433772.

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10.1177_1756285611433772.pdf (Any fulltext), 838KB
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© The Author(s), 2012. Reprints and permissions: http://www.sagepub.co.uk/ journalsPermissions.nav
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Mayer, Marie Cathrin1, Author              
Meinl, Edgar1, Author              
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1Department: Neuroimmunology / Wekerle, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1113547              

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Free keywords: Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, detection methods of autoantibodies, multiple sclerosis, ADEM
 Abstract: B cells and antibodies constitute an important element in different inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Autoantibodies can serve as a biomarker to identify disease subgroups and may in addition contribute to the pathogenic process. One candidate autoantigen for multiple sclerosis (MS) is myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). MOG is localized at the outermost surface of myelin in the CNS and has been the focus of extensive research for more than 30 years. Its role as an important autoantigen for T cells and as a target of demyelinating autoantibodies has been established in several variants of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. The literature regarding antibodies to MOG in MS patients is confusing and contradictory. Recent studies, however, have described high levels of antibodies to conformationally correct MOG in pediatric acquired demyelination, both acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and MS. In adult MS, such antibodies are rarely found and then only at low levels. In this review, we summarize key findings from animal models and patient studies, discuss challenges in detecting anti-MOG antibodies in patients and present recent approaches to identifying new autoantigens in MS.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 13
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/ 1756285611433772
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Title: Therapeutic Advances in Neurological Disorders
  Abbreviation : Ther Adv Neurol Disord
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 5 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 147 - 159 Identifier: ISSN: 1756-2864