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  Who Ate Whom? Adaptive Helicobacter Genomic Changes That Accompanied a Host Jump from Early Humans to Large Felines

Eppinger, M., Baar, C., Linz, B., Raddatz, G., Lanz, C., Keller, H., et al. (2006). Who Ate Whom? Adaptive Helicobacter Genomic Changes That Accompanied a Host Jump from Early Humans to Large Felines. PLoS Genetics, 2(7): e120, pp. 1097-1110. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.0020120.

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Genre: Journal Article
Alternative Title : PLoS Genet

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PLoS_Genet_2(7)_e120.pdf (Publisher version), 4MB
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© 2006 Eppinger et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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 Creators:
Eppinger, Mark, Author
Baar, Claudia, Author
Linz, Bodo1, Author              
Raddatz, Günter2, Author
Lanz, Christa2, Author
Keller, Heike2, Author
Morelli, Giovanna1, Author              
Gressmann, Helga1, Author              
Achtman, Mark1, Author              
Schuster, Stephan C.2, Author
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1Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1664147              
2Max Planck Society, ou_persistent13              

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 Abstract: Helicobacter pylori infection of humans is so old that its population genetic structure reflects that of ancient human migrations. A closely related species, Helicobacter acinonychis, is specific for large felines, including cheetahs, lions, and tigers, whereas hosts more closely related to humans harbor more distantly related Helicobacter species. This observation suggests a jump between host species. But who ate whom and when did it happen? In order to resolve this question, we determined the genomic sequence of H. acinonychis strain Sheeba and compared it to genomes from H. pylori. The conserved core genes between the genomes are so similar that the host jump probably occurred within the last 200,000 (range 50,000–400,000) years. However, the Sheeba genome also possesses unique features that indicate the direction of the host jump, namely from early humans to cats. Sheeba possesses an unusually large number of highly fragmented genes, many encoding outer membrane proteins, which may have been destroyed in order to bypass deleterious responses from the feline host immune system. In addition, the few Sheeba-specific genes that were found include a cluster of genes encoding sialylation of the bacterial cell surface carbohydrates, which were imported by horizontal genetic exchange and might also help to evade host immune defenses. These results provide a genomic basis for elucidating molecular events that allow bacteria to adapt to novel animal hosts.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006-07-28
 Publication Status: Published in print
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Title: PLoS Genetics
  Alternative Title : PLoS Genet
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 2 (7) Sequence Number: e120 Start / End Page: 1097 - 1110 Identifier: -