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  Sex and virulence in Escherichia coli: an evolutionary perspective

Wirth, T., Falush, D., Lan, R., Colles, F., Mensa, P., Wieler, L. H., et al. (2006). Sex and virulence in Escherichia coli: an evolutionary perspective. Molecular Microbiology, 60(5), 1136-1151.

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Genre: Journal Article
Alternative Title : Mol. Microbiol.

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Mol_microbiol_2006_60_1136.pdf (Publisher version), 1012KB
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© 2006 The Authors
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 Creators:
Wirth, Thierry1, Author              
Falush, Daniel1, Author              
Lan, Ruiting, Author
Colles, Frances, Author
Mensa, Patience, Author
Wieler, Lothar H., Author
Karch, Helge, Author
Reeves, Peter R., Author
Maiden, Martin C. J., Author
Ochman, Howard, Author
Achtman, Mark1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1664147              

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 Abstract: Pathogenic Escherichia coli cause over 160 million cases of dysentery and one million deaths per year, whereas non-pathogenic E. coli constitute part of the normal intestinal flora of healthy mammals and birds. The evolutionary pathways underlying this dichotomy in bacterial lifestyle were investigated by multilocus sequence typing of a global collection of isolates. Specific pathogen types [enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, K1 and Shigella] have arisen independently and repeatedly in several lineages, whereas other lineages contain only few pathogens. Rates of evolution have accelerated in pathogenic lineages, culminating in highly virulent organisms whose genomic contents are altered frequently by increased rates of homologous recombination; thus, the evolution of virulence is linked to bacterial sex. This long-term pattern of evolution was observed in genes distributed throughout the genome, and thereby is the likely result of episodic selection for strains that can escape the host immune response.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 300487
ISI: 000237423300006
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Title: Molecular Microbiology
  Alternative Title : Mol. Microbiol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 60 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1136 - 1151 Identifier: ISSN: 0950-382X