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  Cerebellar contribution to the prediction of self-initiated sounds

Knolle, F., Schröger, E., & Kotz, S. A. (2013). Cerebellar contribution to the prediction of self-initiated sounds. Cortex, 49(9), 2449-2461. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2012.12.012.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-CACA-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-84F2-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Knolle, Franziska1, Author              
Schröger, Erich2, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Minerva Research Group Neurocognition of Rhythm in Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634560              
2Institute of Psychology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Cerebellum; Auditory prediction; Selectivity; Forward-model; Event-related potentials (ERP)
 Abstract: In everyday life we frequently make the fundamental distinction between sensory input resulting from our own actions and sensory input that is externally-produced. It has been speculated that making this distinction involves the use of an internal forward-model, which enables the brain to adjust its response to self-produced sensory input. In the auditory domain, this idea has been supported by event-related potential and evoked-magnetic field studies revealing that self-initiated sounds elicit a suppressed N100/M100 brain response compared to externally-produced sounds. Moreover, a recent study reveals that patients with cerebellar lesions do not show a significant N100-suppression effect. This result supports the theory that the cerebellum is essential for generating internal forward predictions. However, all except one study compared self-initiated and externally-produced auditory stimuli in separate conditions. Such a setup prevents an unambiguous interpretation of the N100-suppression effect when distinguishing self- and externally-produced sensory stimuli: the N100-suppression can also be explained by differences in the allocation of attention in different conditions. In the current electroencephalography (EEG)-study we investigated the N100-suppression effect in an altered design comparing (i) self-initiated sounds to externally-produced sounds that occurred intermixed with these self-initiated sounds (i.e., both sound types occurred in the same condition) or (ii) self-initiated sounds to externally-produced sounds that occurred in separate conditions. Results reveal that the cerebellum generates selective predictions in response to self-initiated sounds independent of condition type: cerebellar patients, in contrast to healthy controls, do not display an N100-suppression effect in response to self-initiated sounds when intermixed with externally-produced sounds. Furthermore, the effect is not influenced by the temporal proximity of externally-produced sounds to self-produced sounds. Controls and patients showed a P200-reduction in response to self-initiated sounds. This suggests the existence of an additional and probably more conscious mechanism for identifying self-generated sounds that does not functionally depend on the cerebellum.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-11-012012-07-222012-12-112012-12-222013-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2012.12.012
PMID: 23318086
Other: Epub 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: Cortex
  Other : Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Milan [etc.] : Elsevier Masson SAS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 49 (9) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2449 - 2461 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-9452
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925393344