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  The implicit learning of metrical and nonmetrical temporal patterns

Schultz, B. G., Stevens, C. J., Keller, P. E., & Tillmann, B. (2013). The implicit learning of metrical and nonmetrical temporal patterns. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66(2), 360-380. doi:10.1080/17470218.2012.712146.

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 Creators:
Schultz, Benjamin G.1, 2, Author
Stevens, Catherine J.1, Author
Keller, Peter E.2, 3, Author           
Tillmann, Barbara1, 2, Author
Affiliations:
1The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              
2Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, France, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              

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Free keywords: Meter; Rhythm; Temporal cognition; Process dissociation procedure
 Abstract: Implicit learning (IL) occurs unintentionally. IL of temporal patterns has received minimal attention, and results are mixed regarding whether IL of temporal patterns occurs in the absence of a concurrent ordinal pattern. Two experiments examined the IL of temporal patterns and the conditions under which IL is exhibited. Experiment 1 examined whether uncertainty of the upcoming stimulus identity obscures learning. Based on probabilistic uncertainty, it was hypothesized that stimulus-detection tasks are more sensitive to temporal learning than multiple-alternative forced-choice tasks because of response uncertainty in the latter. Results demonstrated IL of metrical patterns in the stimulus-detection but not the multiple-alternative task. Experiment 2 investigated whether properties of rhythm (i.e., meter) benefit IL using the stimulus-detection task. The metric binding hypothesis states that metrical frameworks guide attention to periodic points in time. Based on the metric binding hypothesis, it was hypothesized that metrical patterns are learned faster than nonmetrical patterns. Results demonstrated learning of metrical and nonmetrical patterns but metrical patterns were not learned more readily than nonmetrical patterns. However, abstraction of a metrical framework was still evident in the metrical condition. The present study shows IL of auditory temporal patterns in the absence of an ordinal pattern.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-10-272012-07-302013-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2012.712146
PMID: 22943558
Other: Epub 2012
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Title: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Academic Press [etc.]
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 66 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 360 - 380 Identifier: ISSN: 0033-555X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925255152_1