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  Imitating others' actions: Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the parietal opercula reveals the processes underlying automatic imitation

Mengotti, P., Ticini, L. F., Waszak, F., Schütz-Bosbach, S., & Rumiati, R. I. (2013). Imitating others' actions: Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the parietal opercula reveals the processes underlying automatic imitation. European Journal of Neuroscience, 37(2), 316-322. doi:10.1111/ejn.12019.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-E2FD-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-ACC8-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Mengotti, Paola1, Author
Ticini, Luca Francesco2, Author              
Waszak, Florian3, Author
Schütz-Bosbach, Simone2, Author              
Rumiati, Raffaella I.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Cognitive Neuroscience Sector, International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste, Italy, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Body and Self, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634554              
3Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Compatibility; Finger; Imitation; Operculum; TMS
 Abstract: The human tendency to imitate gestures performed by conspecifics is automatic in nature. However, whether this automatic imitation can be considered as a true imitative phenomenon or only as a special instance of spatial compatibility is still being debated. New evidence suggests that automatic imitation, otherwise known as ‘imitative compatibility’, shall be considered as a phenomenon that operates independently from spatial compatibility. So far there are only a few investigations directly aimed at identifying the neural structures dedicated to this process. In the present study, we applied double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the parietal opercula to further investigate the role of these regions in coding imitative compatibility. We found that a temporary disruption of parietal opercula caused the reduction of the imitative compatibility relative to the sham condition. In particular, the TMS interference with the parietal opercula's activity modulated the imitative compatibility but not the spatial compatibility, suggesting that these two processes are likely to be independent.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-09-072012-07-242012-09-142012-10-292013-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/ejn.12019
PMID: 23106245
Other: Epub 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: European Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : Eur. J. Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford, UK : Published on behalf of the European Neuroscience Association by Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 37 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 316 - 322 Identifier: ISSN: 0953-816X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925575988