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  Being and feeling in sync with an adaptive virtual partner: Brain mechanisms underlying dynamic cooperativity

Fairhurst, M. T., Janata, P., & Keller, P. E. (2013). Being and feeling in sync with an adaptive virtual partner: Brain mechanisms underlying dynamic cooperativity. Cerebral Cortex, 23(11), 2592-2600. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhs243.

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 Creators:
Fairhurst, Merle T.1, Author              
Janata, Petr2, 3, Author
Keller, Peter E.1, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
2Department of Psychology, University of California Davis, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Center for Mind and Brain, University of California Davis, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
4The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cognitive control; Cooperation; Entrainment; fMRI; Virtual partner
 Abstract: Cooperation is intrinsic to the human ability to work together toward common goals, and depends on sensing and reacting to dynamically changing relationships between coacting partners. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a paradigm in which an adaptive pacing signal simulates a virtual partner, we examined the neural substrates underlying dynamic joint action. A single parameter controlled the degree to which the virtual partner adapted its behavior in relation to participant taps, thus simulating varying degrees of cooperativity. Analyses of fMRI data using objective and subjective measures of synchronization quality found the relative balance of activity in two distinct neural networks to depend on the degree of the virtual partner's adaptivity. At lower degrees of adaptivity, when the virtual partner was easier to synchronize with, cortical midline structures were activated in conjunction with premotor areas, suggesting a link between the action and socio-affective components of cooperation. By contrast, right lateral prefrontal areas associated with central executive control processes were recruited during more cognitively challenging interactions while synchronizing with an overly adaptive virtual partner. Together, the reduced adaptive sensorimotor synchronization paradigm and pattern of results illuminate neural mechanisms that may underlie the socio-emotional consequences of different degrees of entrainment success.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-08-042013
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhs243
PMID: 22892422
Other: Epub 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: Cerebral Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 23 (11) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2592 - 2600 Identifier: ISSN: 1047-3211
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925592440