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  Synchronization with competing visual and auditory rhythms: Bouncing ball meets metronome

Hove, M. J., Iversen, J. R., Zhang, A., & Repp, B. H. (2013). Synchronization with competing visual and auditory rhythms: Bouncing ball meets metronome. Psychological Research, 77(4), 388-398. doi:10.1007/s00426-012-0441-0.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-E9A1-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-ACA2-4
Genre: Journal Article

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Hove_2012_Synchronization.pdf (Preprint), 441KB
 
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 Creators:
Hove, Michael J.1, Author              
Iversen, John R.2, Author
Zhang, Allen3, Author
Repp, Bruno H.4, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
2The Neurosciences Institute, San Diego, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, USA, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Synchronization of finger taps with periodically flashing visual stimuli is known to be much more variable than synchronization with an auditory metronome. When one of these rhythms is the synchronization target and the other serves as a distracter at various temporal offsets, strong auditory dominance is observed. However, it has recently been shown that visuomotor synchronization improves substantially with moving stimuli such as a continuously bouncing ball. The present study pitted a bouncing ball against an auditory metronome in a target–distracter synchronization paradigm, with the participants being auditory experts (musicians) and visual experts (video gamers and ball players). Synchronization was still less variable with auditory than with visual target stimuli in both groups. For musicians, auditory stimuli tended to be more distracting than visual stimuli, whereas the opposite was the case for the visual experts. Overall, there was no main effect of distracter modality. Thus, a distracting spatiotemporal visual rhythm can be as effective as a distracting auditory rhythm in its capacity to perturb synchronous movement, but its effectiveness also depends on modality-specific expertise.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-02-022012-05-112012-05-262013-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00426-012-0441-0
PMID: 22638726
Other: Epub 2012
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Title: Psychological Research
  Other : Psychol. Res.-Psychol. Forsch.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Berlin : Springer-Verlag
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 77 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 388 - 398 Identifier: ISSN: 0340-0727
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925518603