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  Early visual and auditory processing rely on modality-specific attentional resources

Keitel, C., Maess, B., Schröger, E., & Müller, M. M. (2013). Early visual and auditory processing rely on modality-specific attentional resources. NeuroImage, 70, 240-249. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.12.046.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-F40F-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-84A4-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Keitel, Christian1, Author
Maess, Burkhard2, Author              
Schröger, Erich1, Author
Müller, Matthias M.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Institute of Psychology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Methods and Development Unit MEG and EEG: Signal Analysis and Modelling, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634559              

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Free keywords: Attentional resource; EEG; Intermodal attention; MEG; Steady-state response
 Abstract: Many everyday situations require focusing on visual or auditory information while ignoring the other modality. Previous findings suggest an attentional mechanism that operates between sensory modalities and governs such states. To date, evidence is equivocal as to whether this ‘intermodal’ attention relies on a distribution of resources either common or specific to sensory modalities. We provide new insights by investigating consequences of a shift from simultaneous (‘bimodal’) attention to vision and audition to unimodal selective attention. Concurrently presented visual and auditory stimulus streams were frequency-tagged to elicit steady-state responses (SSRs) recorded simultaneously in electro- and magnetoencephalograms (EEG/MEG). After the shift, decreased amplitudes of the SSR corresponding to the unattended sensory stream indicated reduced processing. We did not observe an amplitude increase of the SSR corresponding to the attended sensory stream. These findings are incompatible with a common-resources account. A redistribution of attentional resources between vision and audition would result in simultaneous processing gain in the attended sensory modality and reduction in the unattended sensory modality. Our results favor a modality-specific-resources account, which allows for independent modulation of early cortical processing in each sensory modality.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-12-202012-12-312013-04-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.12.046
PMID: 23287527
Other: Epub 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 70 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 240 - 249 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166