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  Differential pattern of functional brain plasticity after compassion and empathy training

Klimecki, O. M., Leiberg, S., Ricard, M., & Singer, T. (2014). Differential pattern of functional brain plasticity after compassion and empathy training. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 9(6), 873-879. doi:10.1093/scan/nst060.

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 Creators:
Klimecki, Olga M.1, 2, Author              
Leiberg, S.3, Author
Ricard, M.4, Author
Singer, Tania1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
3Laboratory for Social and Neural Systems Research, Department of Economics, University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
4Mind and Life Institute, Hadley, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Social; Emotion; Insula; Medial orbitofrontal cortex
 Abstract: Although empathy is crucial for successful social interactions, excessive sharing of others negative emotions may be maladaptive and constitute a source of burnout. To investigate functional neural plasticity underlying the augmentation of empathy and to test the counteracting potential of compassion, one group of participants was first trained in empathic resonance and subsequently in compassion. In response to videos depicting human suffering, empathy training, but not memory training (control group), increased negative affect and brain activations in anterior insula and anterior midcingulate cortexbrain regions previously associated with empathy for pain. In contrast, subsequent compassion training could reverse the increase in negative effect and, in contrast, augment self-reports of positive affect. In addition, compassion training increased activations in a non- overlapping brain network spanning ventral striatum, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and medial orbitofrontal cortex. We conclude that training compassion may reflect a new coping strategy to overcome empathic distress and strengthen resilience.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-12-102013-04-092013-04-102014-06-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/scan/nst060
PMID: 23576808
PMC: PMC4040103
Other: Epub 2013
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Title: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 873 - 879 Identifier: ISSN: 1749-5016
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000223760