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  Mathematical Model of Influenza A Virus Production in Large-Scale Microcarrier Culture

Möhler, L., Flockerzi, D., Sann, H., & Reichl, U. (2005). Mathematical Model of Influenza A Virus Production in Large-Scale Microcarrier Culture. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 90(1), 46-58. doi:10.1002/bit.20363.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-9CEF-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-3ED4-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Möhler, L.1, Author              
Flockerzi, D.2, Author              
Sann, H.1, Author              
Reichl, U.1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society, ou_1738140              
2Systems and Control Theory, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society, ou_1738154              
3Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, ou_1738156              

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Free keywords: mathematical model; virus dynamics; animal cell culture; influenza virus; vaccine production
 Abstract: A mathematical model that describes the replication of influenza A virus in animal cells in large-scale microcarrier culture is presented. The virus is produced in a two-step process, which begins with the growth of adherent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. After several washing steps serum-free virus maintenance medium is added, and the cells are infected with equine influenza virus (A/Equi 2 (H3N8), Newmarket 1/93). A time-delayed model is considered that has three state variables: the number of uninfected cells, infected cells, and free virus particles. It is assumed that uninfected cells adsorb the virus culture.at the time of infection. The infection rate is proportional to the number of uninfected cells and free virions.Depending on multiplicity of infection (MOI), not necessarily all cells are infected by this first step leading to the production of free virions. Newly produced viruses can infect the remaining uninfected cells in a chain reaction. To follow the time course of virus replication, infected cells were stained with fluorescent antibodies. Quantitation of influenza viruses by a hemagglutination assay (HA) enabled the estimation of the total number of new virions produced, which is relevant for the production of inactivated influenza vaccines.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2005
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 238118
DOI: 10.1002/bit.20363
Other: 49/05
 Degree: -

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Title: Biotechnology and Bioengineering
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 90 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 46 - 58 Identifier: -