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  Divergent allele advantage at MHC-DRB through direct and maternal genotypic effects and its consequences for allele pool composition and mating

Lenz, T. L., Mueller, B., Trillmich, F., & Wolf, J. B. W. (2013). Divergent allele advantage at MHC-DRB through direct and maternal genotypic effects and its consequences for allele pool composition and mating. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 280(1762): 20130714. doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.0714.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-7FAA-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-7FAD-3
Genre: Journal Article

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Lenz_2013_ProcB.pdf (Publisher version), 730KB
 
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 Creators:
Lenz, Tobias L.1, Author              
Mueller, Birte, Author
Trillmich, Fritz, Author
Wolf, Jochen B. W., Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: Galápagos sea lion; major histocompatibility complex; survival; reproductive success; overdominance; sequence divergence
 Abstract: It is still debated whether main individual fitness differences in natural populations can be attributed to genome-wide effects or to particular loci of outstanding functional importance such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In a long-term monitoring project on Gala´pagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki), we collected comprehensive fitness and mating data for a total of 506 individuals. Controlling for genome-wide inbreeding, we find strong associations between the MHC locus and nearly all fitness traits. The effect was mainly attributable to MHC sequence divergence and could be decomposed into contributions of own and maternal genotypes. In consequence, the population seems to have evolved a pool of highly divergent alleles conveying near-optimal MHC divergence even by random mating. Our results demonstrate that a single locus can significantly contribute to fitness in the wild and provide conclusive evidence for the ‘divergent allele advantage’ hypothesis, a special form of balancing selection with interesting evolutionary implications.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-03-212013-04-222013-05-15
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.0714
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Title: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 280 (1762) Sequence Number: 20130714 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8452 (print)
ISSN: 1471-2954 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/110975500577295_2