English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Predicting free choices for abstract intentions

Soon, C. S., Hanxi He, A., Bode, S., & Haynes, J.-D. (2013). Predicting free choices for abstract intentions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(15), 6217-6222. doi:10.1073/pnas.1212218110.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-A748-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-AC3C-9
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Soon, Chun Siong1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Author              
Hanxi He, Anna2, 6, Author
Bode, Stefan2, 5, 7, Author              
Haynes, John-Dylan1, 2, 4, 5, 8, Author              
Affiliations:
1Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Fellow Research Group Attention and Awareness, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634553              
3Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders, Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Neurology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Australia, ou_persistent22              
7Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia, ou_persistent22              
8Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Unconscious neural activity has been repeatedly shown to precede and potentially even influence subsequent free decisions. However, to date, such findings have been mostly restricted to simple motor choices, and despite considerable debate, there is no evidence that the outcome of more complex free decisions can be predicted from prior brain signals. Here, we show that the outcome of a free decision to either add or subtract numbers can already be decoded from neural activity in medial prefrontal and parietal cortex 4 s before the participant reports they are consciously making their choice. These choice-predictive signals co-occurred with the so-called default mode brain activity pattern that was still dominant at the time when the choice-predictive signals occurred. Our results suggest that unconscious preparation of free choices is not restricted to motor preparation. Instead, decisions at multiple scales of abstraction evolve from the dynamics of preceding brain activity.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-03-182013-04-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1212218110
PMID: 23509300
PMC: PMC3625266
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: National Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 110 (15) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 6217 - 6222 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427230