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  Quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP) using mass spectrometry: general characteristics and application.

Lehmann, S., Hoofnagle, A., Hochstrasser, D., Brede, C., Glueckmann, M., Cocho, J. A., et al. (2013). Quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP) using mass spectrometry: general characteristics and application. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, 51(5), 919-935. doi:10.1515/cclm-2012-0723.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-A7FF-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-CA4F-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Lehmann, S., Author
Hoofnagle, A., Author
Hochstrasser, D., Author
Brede, C., Author
Glueckmann, M., Author
Cocho, J. A., Author
Ceglarek, U., Author
Lenz, C.1, Author              
Vialaret, J., Author
Scherl, A., Author
Hirtz, C., Author
Affiliations:
1Research Group of Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578613              

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 Abstract: Proteomics studies typically aim to exhaustively detect peptides/proteins in a given biological sample. Over the past decade, the number of publications using pro teomics methodologies has exploded. This was made possible due to the availability of high-quality genomic data and many technological advances in the fields of microfluidics and mass spectrometry. Proteomics in biomedical research was initially used in 'functional' studies for the identification of proteins involved in pathophysiological processes, complexes and networks. Improved sensitivity of instrumentation facilitated the analysis of even more complex sample types, including human biological fluids. It is at that point the field of clinical proteomics was born, and its fundamental aim was the discovery and (ideally) validation of biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, or therapeutic monitoring of disease. Eventually, it was recognized that the technologies used in clinical proteomics studies [particularly liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)] could represent an alternative to classical immunochemical assays. Prior to deploying MS in the measurement of peptides/proteins in the clinical laboratory, it seems likely that traditional proteomics workflows and data management systems will need to adapt to the clinical environment and meet in vitro diagnostic (IVD) regulatory constraints. This defines a new field, as reviewed in this article, that we have termed quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP).

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-11-232013-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1515/cclm-2012-0723
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Title: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 51 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 919 - 935 Identifier: -