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  The brain dynamics of rapid perceptual adaptation to adverse listening conditions

Erb, J., Henry, M., Eisner, F., & Obleser, J. (2013). The brain dynamics of rapid perceptual adaptation to adverse listening conditions. The Journal of Neuroscience, 33(26), 10688-10697. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4596-12.2013.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B459-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-AD50-0
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Erb, Julia1, Author              
Henry, Molly1, Author              
Eisner, Frank2, Author
Obleser, Jonas1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_751545              
2Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 6525 XD Nijmegen, The Netherlands, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Listeners show a remarkable ability to quickly adjust to degraded speech input. Here, we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms of such short-term perceptual adaptation. In a sparse-sampling, cardiac-gated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquisition, human listeners heard and repeated back 4-band-vocoded sentences (in which the temporal envelope of the acoustic signal is preserved, while spectral information is highly degraded). Clear-speech trials were included as baseline. An additional fMRI experiment on ampli- tude modulation rate discrimination quantified the convergence of neural mechanisms that subserve coping with challenging listening conditions for speech and non-speech. First, the degraded speech task revealed an “executive” network (comprising the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex), parts of which were also activated in the non-speech discrimination task. Second, trial-by-trial fluctua- tions in successful comprehension of degraded speech drove hemodynamic signal change in classic “language” areas (bilateral temporal cortices). Third, as listeners perceptually adapted to degraded speech, downregulation in a cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit was observable. The present data highlight differential upregulation and downregulation in auditory–language and executive networks, respectively, with important subcortical contributions when successfully adapting to a challenging listening situation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-04-242012-09-262013-05-182013-06-26
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4596-12.2013
PMID: 23804092
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Title: The Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : J. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Baltimore, MD : The Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 33 (26) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 10688 - 10697 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925502187_1