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  How are facial expressions represented in the human brain?

Schultz, J., Fernandez Cruz, A., de la Rosa, S., Bülthoff, H., & Kaulard, K. (2012). How are facial expressions represented in the human brain? Perception, 41(ECVP Abstract Supplement), 38.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B65C-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1D04-9
Genre: Meeting Abstract

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 Creators:
Schultz, J1, 2, Author              
Fernandez Cruz, AL1, 2, Author              
de la Rosa, S1, 2, 3, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Kaulard, K1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Project group: Cognitive Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528702              

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 Abstract: The dynamic facial expressions that we encounter every day can carry a myriad of social signals. What are the neural mechanisms allowing us to decode these signals? A useful basis for this decoding could be representations in which the facial expressions are set in relation to each other. Here, we compared the behavioral and neural representations of 12 facial expressions presented as pictures and videos. Behavioral representations of these expressions were computed based on the results of a semantic differential task. Neural representations of these expressions were obtained by multivariate pattern analysis of functional magnetic imaging data. The two kinds of representations were compared using correlations. For expression videos, the results show a significant correlation between the behavioral and neural representations in the superior temporal sulcus (STS), the fusiform face area, the occipital face area and the amygdala, all in the left hemisphere. For expression pictures, a significant correlation was found only in the left STS. These results suggest that of all tested regions, the left STS contains the neural representation of facial expressions that is closest to their behavioral representation. This confirms the predominant role of STS in coding changeable aspects of faces, which includes expressions.

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 Dates: 2012-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: SchultzFdBK2012
DOI: 10.1177/03010066120410S101
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Title: 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2012)
Place of Event: Alghero, Italy
Start-/End Date: 2012-09-02 - 2012-09-06

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Title: Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Pion Ltd.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 41 (ECVP Abstract Supplement) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 38 Identifier: ISSN: 0301-0066
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925509369