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  Effects of lactate on the early visual cortex of non-human primates, investigated by pharmaco-MRI and neurochemical analysis

von Pföstl, V., Li, J., Zaldivar, D., Goense, J., Zhang, X., Serr, N., et al. (2012). Effects of lactate on the early visual cortex of non-human primates, investigated by pharmaco-MRI and neurochemical analysis. NeuroImage, 61(1), 98-105. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.02.082.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B75A-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8833-C
Genre: Journal Article

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von Pföstl, V1, 2, Author              
Li, J1, 2, Author              
Zaldivar, D1, 2, Author              
Goense, J1, 2, Author              
Zhang, X, Author              
Serr, N1, 2, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Rauch, A1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: In contrast to the limited use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in clinical diagnostics, it is currently a mainstay of neuroimaging in clinical and basic brain research. However, its non-invasive use in combination with its high temporal and spatial resolution would make fMRI a perfect diagnostic tool. We are interested in whether a pharmacological challenge imposed on the brain can be reliably traced by the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal and possibly further exploited for diagnostics. We have chosen a systemic challenge with lactate and pyruvate to test whether the physiological formation of these monocarboxylic acids contributes to the BOLD signal and can be detected using fMRI. This information is also of interest because lactate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid rise concomitantly with reduced vascular responsiveness of the brain during the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). We studied the BOLD response after a low-dose lactate challenge and monitored the induced plasma lactate levels in anesthetized non-human primates. We observed reliable lactate-induced BOLD responses, which could be confirmed at population and individual level by their strong correlation with systemic lactate concentrations. Comparable BOLD effects where observed after a slow infusion of pyruvate. We show here that physiological changes in lactate and pyruvate levels are indeed reflected in the BOLD signal, and describe the technical prerequisites to reliably trace a lactate challenge using BOLD-fMRI.

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 Dates: 2012-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.02.082
BibTex Citekey: vonPfostlLZGZSLR2012
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 61 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 98 - 105 Identifier: -