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  Where, When and Why Brain Activation Differs for Bilinguals and Monolinguals during Picture Naming and Reading Aloud

Parker Jones, O., Green, D., Grogan, A., Pliatsikas, C., Filippopolitis, K., Ali, N., et al. (2012). Where, When and Why Brain Activation Differs for Bilinguals and Monolinguals during Picture Naming and Reading Aloud. Cerebral Cortex, 22(4), 892-902. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhr161.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B7E4-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8876-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Parker Jones, O, Author
Green, DW, Author
Grogan, A, Author
Pliatsikas, C, Author
Filippopolitis, K, Author
Ali, N, Author
Lee, HL1, 2, Author              
Ramsden, S, Author
Gazarian, K, Author
Prejawa, S, Author
Seghier, ML, Author
Price, CJ, Author
Affiliations:
1Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497804              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that when bilinguals named pictures or read words aloud, in their native or nonnative language, activation was higher relative to monolinguals in 5 left hemisphere regions: dorsal precentral gyrus, pars triangularis, pars opercularis, superior temporal gyrus, and planum temporale. We further demonstrate that these areas are sensitive to increasing demands on speech production in monolinguals. This suggests that the advantage of being bilingual comes at the expense of increased work in brain areas that support monolingual word processing. By comparing the effect of bilingualism across a range of tasks, we argue that activation is higher in bilinguals compared with monolinguals because word retrieval is more demanding; articulation of each word is less rehearsed; and speech output needs careful monitoring to avoid errors when competition for word selection occurs between, as well as within, language.

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 Dates: 2012-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhr161
BibTex Citekey: ParkerJonesGGPFALRGPSP2011
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Title: Cerebral Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 22 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 892 - 902 Identifier: -