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  Retinotopic maps and hemodynamic delays in the human visual cortex measured using arterial spin labeling

Cavusoglu, M., Bartels, A., Yesilyurt, B., & Uludag, K. (2012). Retinotopic maps and hemodynamic delays in the human visual cortex measured using arterial spin labeling. NeuroImage, 59(4), 4044-4054. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.10.056.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B832-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-89EB-C
Genre: Journal Article

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Cavusoglu, M1, 2, Author              
Bartels, A, Author              
Yesilyurt, B1, 2, Author              
Uludag, K, Author              
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1Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497796              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Cortical representations of the visual field are organized retinotopically, such that nearby neurons have receptive fields at nearby locations in the image. Many studies have used blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI to non-invasively construct retinotopic maps in humans. The accuracy of the maps depends on the spatial extent of the metabolic and hemodynamic changes induced by the neural activity. Several studies using gradient-echo MRI at 1.5 T and 3 T showed that most of the BOLD signal originates from veins, which might lead to a spatial displacement from the actual site of neuronal activation, thus reducing the specificity of the functional localization. In contrast to BOLD signal, cerebral blood flow (CBF) as measured using arterial spin labeling (ASL) is less or not at all affected by remote draining veins, and therefore spatially and temporally more closely linked to the underlying neural activity. In the present study, we determined retinotopic maps in the human brain using CBF as well as using BOLD signal in order to compare their spatial relationship and the temporal delays of each imaging modality for visual areas V1, V2, V3, hV4 and V3AB. We tested the robustness and reproducibility of the maps across different sessions, calculated the overlap as well as signal delay times across visual areas. While area boundaries were relatively well preserved, we found systematic differences of response latencies between CBF and the BOLD signal between areas. In summary, CBF data obtained using ASL allows reliable retinotopic maps to be constructed; this approach is, therefore, suitable for studying visual areas especially in close proximity to large veins where the BOLD signal is spatially inaccurate.

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 Dates: 2012-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.10.056
BibTex Citekey: CavusogluBYU2011
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 59 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4044 - 4054 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166