English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Grid cell remapping in humans

Pape, A.-A., Wolbers T, Schultz, J., Wolbers, T., Schultz, J., Bülthoff, H., & Meilinger, T. (2011). Grid cell remapping in humans. Poster presented at 41st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2011), Washington, DC, USA.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B936-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-1922-C
Genre: Poster

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Pape, A-A1, 2, 3, Author              
Wolbers T, Schultz, J1, 3, Author              
Wolbers, T, Author
Schultz, J1, 3, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 3, Author              
Meilinger, T1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497806              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Grid cells in entorhinal cortex of freely moving rodents were proposed to provide a universal metric of space. They tile the environment into a six-fold symmetric pattern with a particular orientation relative to the environment. The six-fold rotational symmetry of grid patterns can be used to predict a macroscopic signal to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans [Doeller et al, 2010, Nature]. During hippocampal remapping, grid pattern orientations in rats also change. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether orientation changes (i.e., remapping) can also be found in humans. Participants learned object locations within a virtual room (see Figure 1 left side) and retrieved locations from different start locations during two scanning sessions. They then navigated into an adjacent room and repeated the procedure. We extracted grid orientations from odd trials, and predicted the BOLD response in even trials as a function of the deviation between running direction and the estimated grid orientation for each session. This prediction was significant for the right entorhinal cortex, replicating earlier findings. In 80 of the cases grid cell orientations significantly differed between sessions both within a room and between rooms (see Figure 1 right side). Switching off the virtual environment between sessions for about one minute was seemingly sufficient for that. For male, but not for female participants, grid cell orientation was clustered around the random view of the room experienced at session start. Data suggests that human grid cell orientations can be rather flexible which might be due to the virtuality of the experience. Grid cell orientation might at least for male participants be related to the initial view of an environment.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2011-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: PapeWSBM2011
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: 41st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2011)
Place of Event: Washington, DC, USA
Start-/End Date: -

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: 41st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2011)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 288.05 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -