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  Second-Order Relational Manipulations Affect Both Humans and Monkeys

Dahl, C., Logothetis, N., Bülthoff, H., & Wallraven, C. (2011). Second-Order Relational Manipulations Affect Both Humans and Monkeys. PLoS One, 6(10), 1-7. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0025793.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B98A-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-B026-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Dahl, CD1, 2, 3, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 3, Author              
Bülthoff, HH2, 3, Author              
Wallraven, C, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Recognition and individuation of conspecifics by their face is essential for primate social cognition. This ability is driven by a mechanism that integrates the appearance of facial features with subtle variations in their configuration (i.e., second-order relational properties) into a holistic representation. So far, there is little evidence of whether our evolutionary ancestors show sensitivity to featural spatial relations and hence holistic processing of faces as shown in humans. Here, we directly compared macaques with humans in their sensitivity to configurally altered faces in upright and inverted orientations using a habituation paradigm and eye tracking technologies. In addition, we tested for differences in processing of conspecific faces (human faces for humans, macaque faces for macaques) and non-conspecific faces, addressing aspects of perceptual expertise. In both species, we found sensitivity to second-order relational properties for conspecific (expert) faces, when presented in upright, not in inverted, orientation. This shows that macaques possess the requirements for holistic processing, and thus show similar face processing to that of humans.

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 Dates: 2011-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025793
eDoc: e25793
BibTex Citekey: DahlLBW2011
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 7 Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850