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  Does the information in the phase of low frequency LFP reflect the low frequency envelope of local spike rates?

Siadatnejad, S., Panzeri, S., Kayser, C., Logothetis, N., & Montemurro, M. (2011). Does the information in the phase of low frequency LFP reflect the low frequency envelope of local spike rates?. Poster presented at Twentieth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting (CNS*2011), Stockholm, Sweden.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BB3C-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-4BB5-E
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Siadatnejad, S, Author
Panzeri, S, Author              
Kayser, C1, 2, 3, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 3, Author              
Montemurro, MA, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Research Group Physiology of Sensory Integration, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497808              
3Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              

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 Abstract: Recently, it has been shown that when the timing of spikes is measured relative to the phase of the cortical local field potentials (LFP), spikes can carry substantial more information about an external stimulus [1]. Experimental studies in sensory cortices of macaque have shown that the extra information obtained with such phase-of-firing codes above that in the firing rate alone ranges from 55 in primary visual cortex [1] to more than 100 in primary auditory cortex [2]. Here, we use a mathematical model that relates local spike trains and the resulting LFP, to explain the emergence of the phase-of-firing codes in cortex. The model is based on the one proposed in [3] and incorporates two types of integration over the spiking activity: i) a time convolution that results from the filtering properties of neural structures [4], which embeds history effects in LFP from past spiking activity, and ii) an integration step over the activity of neurons in the neighbourhood of the measuring electrode. When the spikes recorded from macaque primary visual cortex were used to synthesize the LFP, the model could reproduce the phase-of-firing information found using the real LFP, as shown in Figure 1. This suggests that an important component of phase-of-firing information originates from the surrounding neural population and past spiking activity. The next question that arises is what is the relative contribution of the neuron population size and the length of the firing rate history embedded in the LFP. We are currently investigating this question by parametrically varying both the population size and time integration ranges in generating the synthetic LFP.

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 Dates: 2011-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1186/1471-2202-12-S1-P227
BibTex Citekey: SiadatnejadPKLM2011
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Title: Twentieth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting (CNS*2011)
Place of Event: Stockholm, Sweden
Start-/End Date: 2011-07-23 - 2011-07-28

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Title: BMC Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: BioMed Central
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (Supplement 1) Sequence Number: P227 Start / End Page: 136 - 137 Identifier: ISSN: 1471-2202
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111000136905018