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  Disrupting Parietal Function Prolongs Dominance Durations in Binocular Rivalry

Zaretskaya, N., Thielscher, A., Logothetis, N., & Bartels, A. (2010). Disrupting Parietal Function Prolongs Dominance Durations in Binocular Rivalry. Current Biology, 20(23), 2106-2111. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2010.10.046.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BD1E-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-E33C-A
Genre: Journal Article

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Zaretskaya, N1, 2, Author              
Thielscher, A2, 3, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Bartels, A1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Former Department MRZ, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528700              

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 Abstract: Human brain imaging studies of bistable perceptual phenomena revealed that frontal and parietal areas are activated during perceptual switches between the two conflicting percepts [1,2,3]. However, these studies do not provide information about causality, i.e., whether activity reports a consequence or a cause of the perceptual change. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to individually localize four parietal regions involved in perceptual switches during binocular rivalry in 15 subjects and subsequently disturbed their neural processing and that of a control site using 2 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during binocular rivalry. We found that TMS over one of the sites, the right intraparietal sulcus (IPS), prolonged the periods of stable percepts. Additionally, the more lateralized the blood oxygen level-dependent signal was in IPS, the more lateralized the TMS effects were. Lateralization varied considerably across subjects, with a right-hemispheric bias. Control replay e xperiments rule out nonspecific effects of TMS on task performance, reaction times, or eye blinks. Our results thus demonstrate a causal, destabilizing, and individually lateralized effect of normal IPS function on perceptual continuity in rivalry. This is in accord with a role of IPS in perceptual selection, relating its role in rivalrous perception to that in attention [4,5,6].

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 Dates: 2010-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2010.10.046
BibTex Citekey: 6902
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Title: Current Biology
  Other : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 20 (23) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2106 - 2111 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107