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  Effects of lactate on primary visual cortex of non-human primates investigated by pharmaco mri and neurochemical analysis

von Pföstl, V., Li, J., Zaldivar, D., Goense, J., Zhang, X., Logothetis, N., et al. (2010). Effects of lactate on primary visual cortex of non-human primates investigated by pharmaco mri and neurochemical analysis. Poster presented at 40th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2010), San Diego, CA, USA.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BD80-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-98ED-8
Genre: Poster

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von Pföstl, V1, 2, Author              
Li, J1, 2, Author              
Zaldivar, D1, 2, Author              
Goense, J1, 2, Author              
Zhang, X, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Rauch, A1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Lactate is a common metabolic product of anaerobic glucose metabolism. It can freely pass the blood brain barrier and it’s known to play also an important role in brain metabolism. We used pharmaco MRI and tested the effect of systemic lactate application on the BOLD signal in primary visual cortex (V1) of anesthetized non-human primates during visual stimulation. We also monitored the pharmacokinetics of the applied lactate in the blood using microdialysis and HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) coupled to MS/MS (mass spectrometry). The lactate pharmacokinetics allows us to investigate the actual plasma concentrations of lactate, and thus, how this correlates to changes in the BOLD signal. After lactate infusion of 0.6 mmol/kg, we observed two consistent effects in the BOLD signal: An initial decrease in visually-induced modulation followed by a subsequent positive baseline shift (n = 10, p < 0.05). The plasma lactate levels significantly increased approximately 9 minutes after systemic application and were correlated with the positive baseline shift in the BOLD signal (p < 0.05). This is in line with a lactate-induced increase of CBF in sensory stimulated regions observed in earlier studies. However, the onsets of lactate increases were late - thereby indicating a lactate buffering mechanism. This could be due to an uptake of lactate by erythrocytes buffering lactate until this capacity is saturated, and plasma levels start to rise with some delay. We conclude that the positive baseline shift in the BOLD signal is triggered by a rise in CBF due to increased plasma lactate. Interestingly, during the observed decrease in visual modulation, (though lactate was already being applied), the lactate levels in the blood were still comparable to the pre-injection concentrations (p < 0.05). How this lactate uptake by erythrocytes influences the BOLD signal has to be further investigated. Nonetheless, our results reveal a complex interaction of lactate in the brain which was only detectable by using pharmaco MRI in combination with neurochemical monitoring of lactate.

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 Dates: 2010-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 7072
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Title: 40th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2010)
Place of Event: San Diego, CA, USA
Start-/End Date: 2010-11-13 - 2010-11-17

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Title: 40th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2010)
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 648.15 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -