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  The effects of electrical microstimulation on cortical signal propagation

Logothetis, N., Augath, M., Murayama, Y., Rauch, A., Sultan, F., Goense, J., et al. (2010). The effects of electrical microstimulation on cortical signal propagation. Nature Neuroscience, 13(10), 1283-1291. doi:10.1038/nn.2631.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BDDA-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-6A9C-8
Genre: Journal Article

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https://www.nature.com/articles/nn.2631.pdf (Publisher version)
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Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Augath, M1, 2, Author              
Murayama, Y1, 2, Author              
Rauch, A1, 2, Author              
Sultan, F, Author              
Goense, J1, 2, Author              
Oeltermann, A1, 2, Author              
Merkle, H, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Electrical stimulation has been used in animals and humans to study potential causal links between neural activity and specific cognitive functions. Recently, it has found increasing use in electrotherapy and neural prostheses. However, the manner in which electrical stimulation–elicited signals propagate in brain tissues remains unclear. We used combined electrostimulation, neurophysiology, microinjection and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the cortical activity patterns elicited during stimulation of cortical afferents in monkeys. We found that stimulation of a site in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) increased the fMRI signal in the regions of primary visual cortex (V1) that received input from that site, but suppressed it in the retinotopically matched regions of extrastriate cortex. Consistent with previous observations, intracranial recordings indicated that a short excitatory response occurring immediately after a stimulation pulse was followed by a long-lasting inhibition. Following microinjections of GABA antagonists in V1, LGN stimulation induced positive fMRI signals in all of the cortical areas. Taken together, our findings suggest that electrical stimulation disrupts cortico-cortical signal propagation by silencing the output of any neocortical area whose afferents are electrically stimulated.

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 Dates: 2010-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/nn.2631
BibTex Citekey: 6794
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Title: Nature Neuroscience
  Other : Nat. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Nature America Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 13 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1283 - 1291 Identifier: ISSN: 1097-6256
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925610931