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  Horizon estimation: Perceptual and computational experiments

Herdtweck, C., & Wallraven, C. (2010). Horizon estimation: Perceptual and computational experiments. Poster presented at 33rd European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2010), Lausanne, Switzerland.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BEDE-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1D45-0
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Herdtweck, C1, 2, 3, Author              
Wallraven, C1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Project group: Cognitive Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528702              

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 Abstract: The human visual system is able to extract a vast amount of scene information from a briefly shown picture. Here, we investigated the ability to accurately and quickly estimate horizon position, which is related to viewer orientation and scene structure in general. In the first, perceptual study, we asked 18 participants to estimate the horizon position after a 150 ms, masked presentation of typical outdoor scenes from different scene categories. All images were shown in upright, blurred, inverted, and cropped conditions to investigate the influence of different information types on the perceptual decision. Overall, participants were fairly consistent in their estimates (r=0.62); inverted images, however, produced significantly worse estimates, indicating the importance of global scene consistency. In the second, computational experiment, we correlated the performance of several algorithms for horizon estimation with the human data—algorithms ranged from simple estimations of bright-dark-transitions to more sophisticated frequency spectrum analyses motivated by previous computational modeling of scene classification results. Correlations between human and computational estimates ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 and varied by algorithm and scene category. Overall, frequency spectrum analysis provided the best results, which taken together with the perceptual data, highlights the importance of global, frequency-based information in scene processing.

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 Dates: 2010-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 6776
DOI: 10.1177/03010066100390S101
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Title: 33rd European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2010)
Place of Event: Lausanne, Switzerland
Start-/End Date: 2010-08-22 - 2010-08-26

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Title: Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Pion Ltd.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 39 (ECVP Abstract Supplement) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 95 Identifier: ISSN: 0301-0066
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925509369