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  Developmental dyslexia in Chinese and English: Dissociating the effect of dyslexia from language differences

Hu, W., Lee, H., Zhang, Q., Liu, T., Shakeshaft, C., Tae, T., et al. (2010). Developmental dyslexia in Chinese and English: Dissociating the effect of dyslexia from language differences. Brain, 133(6), 1694-1706. doi:10.1093/brain/awq106.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C014-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-766A-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Hu, W, Author
Lee, HL1, 2, Author              
Zhang, Q, Author
Liu, T, Author
Shakeshaft, C, Author
Tae, T, Author
Mohamed , S, Author
David, G, Author
Yang, Y, Author
Price, CJ, Author
Affiliations:
1Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497804              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested that developmental dyslexia has a different neural basis in Chinese and English populations because of known differences in the processing demands of the Chinese and English writing systems. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct statistically based investigation into how the effect of dyslexia on brain activation is influenced by the Chinese and English writing systems. Brain activation for semantic decisions on written words was compared in English dyslexics, Chinese dyslexics, English normal readers and Chinese normal readers, while controlling for all other experimental parameters. By investigating the effects of dyslexia and language in one study, we show common activation in Chinese and English dyslexics despite different activation in Chinese versus English normal readers. The effect of dyslexia in both languages was observed as less than normal activation in the left angular gyrus and in left middle frontal, posterior temporal and occipitotemporal regions. Differences in Chinese and English normal reading were observed as increased activation for Chinese relative to English in the left inferior frontal sulcus; and increased activation for English relative to Chinese in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus. These cultural differences were not observed in dyslexics who activated both left inferior frontal sulcus and left posterior superior temporal sulcus, consistent with the use of culturally independent strategies when reading is less efficient. By dissociating the effect of dyslexia from differences in Chinese and English normal reading, our results reconcile brain activation results with a substantial body of behavioural studies showing commonalities in the cognitive manifestation of dyslexia in Chinese and English populations. They also demonstrate the influence of cognitive ability and learning environment on a common neural system for reading.

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 Dates: 2010-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/brain/awq106
BibTex Citekey: 6410
 Degree: -

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Title: Brain
  Other : Brain
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Macmillan
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 133 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1694 - 1706 Identifier: ISSN: 0006-8950
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925385135