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  Motion and form interact in expression recognition: Insights from computer animated faces

Cunningham, D., & Wallraven, C. (2009). Motion and form interact in expression recognition: Insights from computer animated faces. Perception, 38(ECVP Abstract Supplement), 163.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C3C9-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-12B9-8
Genre: Meeting Abstract

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 Creators:
Cunningham, D1, 2, Author              
Wallraven, C1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Faces are a powerful and versatile communication channel. Yet, little is known about which changes are important for expression recognition (for a review, see Schwaninger et al, 2006 Progress in Brain Research). Here, we investigate at what spatial and temporal scales expressions are recognized using five different expressions and three animation styles. In point-light faces, the motion and configuration of facial features can be inferred, but the higher-frequency spatial deformations cannot. In wireframe faces, additional information about spatial configuration and deformation is available. Finally, full-surface faces have the highest degree of static information. In our experiment, we also systematically varied the number of vertices and the presence of motion. Recognition accuracy (6AFC with 'acute;none-of-the-above' option) and perceived intensity (7-point scale) were measured. Overall, in contrast to static expressions, dynamic expressions performed better (72 versus 49, 4.50 versus 3.94) and were largely impervious to geometry reduction. Interestingly, in both conditions, wireframe faces suffered the least from geometry reduction. On the one hand, this suggests that more information than motion of single vertices is necessary for recognition. On the other hand, it shows that the geometry reduction affects the full-surface face more than the abstracted versions.

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 Dates: 2009-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 5920
DOI: 10.1177/03010066090380S101
 Degree: -

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Title: 32nd European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2009)
Place of Event: Regensburg, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2009-08-24 - 2009-08-28

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Title: Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Pion Ltd.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 38 (ECVP Abstract Supplement) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 163 Identifier: ISSN: 0301-0066
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925509369