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  Walking changes perceived visual speed of both expanding and contracting optic flow fields

Souman, J., Eikmeier, V., Ernst, M., & Freeman, T. (2009). Walking changes perceived visual speed of both expanding and contracting optic flow fields. Poster presented at 10th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2009), New York, NY, USA.

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Souman, JL1, 2, 3, Author           
Eikmeier, V2, 3, Author           
Ernst, MO2, 3, Author           
Freeman, TCA3, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497806              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Perceived visual speed has been reported to be reduced during walking.
This effect has been attributed to subtraction of part of the walking
speed from the visual speed (Durgin et al., 2005; 2007). Previously,
we have shown that this subtraction only occurs in a restricted range
of low visual speeds. For higher speeds, visual speed is judged to be
faster during walking than during standing (Souman et al., 2008).
Here, we tested whether the effect of walking on perceived visual
speed depends on the functional relationship between the two (Exp.
1). We measured visual speed perception for contracting optic flow
during forwards walking, in effect reversing the direction of the optic
flow relative to the walking direction. Participants compared the visual
speed of a ground plane, presented through an HMD, in two intervals:
walking or standing. The speed match for three standard speeds (1, 2,
3 m/s) of contracting optic flow was determined in a constant stimuli
paradigm. Similar to expanding optic flow, walking caused slow visual
speeds to appear slower and fast visual speeds to appear faster relative
to standing still. In a second experiment, with expanding optic flow,
we measured visual speed discrimination performance to test whether
the visual system still has access to the retinal speed signal during
walking. In half the trials, walking speed was equal in both intervals
(homogeneous), while it differed in the other half (heterogeneous). If
the visual system has direct access to the retinal speed, differences in
walking speed should not affect discrimination performance. However,
we found that discrimination thresholds were significantly higher in
the heterogeneous trials, suggesting that the retinal speed signal is
not available for speed discrimination.

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 Dates: 2009-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 5957
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Title: 10th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2009)
Place of Event: New York, NY, USA
Start-/End Date: 2009-06-29 - 2009-07-02

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Title: 10th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2009)
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 288 Identifier: -