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  Influence of the size of the field of view on motion perception

Pretto, P., Ogier, M., Bülthoff, H., & Bresciani, J.-P. (2009). Influence of the size of the field of view on motion perception. Computers and Graphics, 33(2), 139-146. doi:10.1016/j.cag.2009.01.003.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C51F-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BA71-D
Genre: Journal Article

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Pretto, P1, 2, Author              
Ogier, M1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Bresciani, J-P1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Efficient navigation requires a good representation of body position/orientation in the environment and an accurate updating of this representation when the body-environment relationship changes. Such updating is based on the ability to correctly estimate the speed and amplitude of body displacements. Because navigation in virtual worlds often relies on the sole visual information, we investigated to which extent the size of the field of view (FoV) affects two basic aspects of motion perception: (i) the perceived amplitude of rotations about the body vertical axis (Experiment 1) and (ii) the perceived speed of forward translations (Experiment 2). Concerning the perception of rotation amplitude, we found that visual flow information gives rise to inaccurate and very variable estimations, with a systematic underestimation of rotations larger than 30 degrees. We also found that the accuracy of the estimations does not depend on the size of the FoV and that horizontal FoVs larger than 30 degrees do not improve the performance. Concerning speed perception, central FoVs smaller than 60 degrees gave rise to an underestimation of the visual speed. On the other hand, occluding the central area leaving only peripheral visual information available induced a systematic overestimation of visual speed, even when only the central 10 degrees of vision were occluded. Taken together, these results suggest that large FoVs are not required to estimate the amplitude of visual rotations about the vertical axis of the body, whereas central FoVs of at least 60 degrees are advisable when speed perception relies on visual flow information.

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 Dates: 2009-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cag.2009.01.003
BibTex Citekey: 5694
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Title: Computers and Graphics
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 33 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 139 - 146 Identifier: ISSN: 0097-8493
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925466253