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  Humans and Macaques Employ Similar Face-Processing Strategies

Dahl, C., Wallraven, C., Bülthoff, H., & Logothetis, N. (2009). Humans and Macaques Employ Similar Face-Processing Strategies. Current Biology, 19(6), 509-513. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2009.01.061.

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Dahl, CD1, 2, Author              
Wallraven, C2, 3, Author              
Bülthoff, HH2, 3, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              

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 Abstract: Primates developed the ability to recognize and individuate their conspecifics by the face. Despite numerous electrophysiological studies in monkeys [1–3], little is known about the face-processing strategies that monkeys employ. In contrast, face perception in humans has been the subject of many studies [4–6] providing evidence for specific face processing that evolves with perceptual expertise [7]. Importantly, humans process faces holistically, here defined as the processing of faces as wholes, rather than as collections of independent features (part-based processing) [8]. The question remains to what extent humans and monkeys share these face-processing mechanisms. By using the same experimental design and stimuli for both monkey and human behavioral experiments, we show that face processing is influenced by the species affiliation of the observed face stimulus (human versus macaque face). Furthermore, stimulus manipulations that selectively reduced holistic and part-based information systematically altered eye-scanning patterns for human and macaque observers similarly. These results demonstrate the similar nature of face perception in humans and monkeys and pin down effects of expert faceprocessing versus novice face-processing strategies. These findings therefore directly contribute to one of the central discussions in the behavioral and neurosciences about how faces are perceived in primates.

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 Dates: 2009-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2009.01.061
BibTex Citekey: 5707
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Title: Current Biology
  Other : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 19 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 509 - 513 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107