English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The Coding of Color, Motion, and Their Conjunction in the Human Visual Cortex

Seymour, K., Clifford, C., Logothetis, N., & Bartels, A. (2009). The Coding of Color, Motion, and Their Conjunction in the Human Visual Cortex. Current Biology, 19(3), 177-183. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2008.12.050.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C5D1-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-CA34-0
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Seymour, K, Author              
Clifford, CWG, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Bartels, A1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Background. Colour and motion serve as the prime examples of segregated processing in the visual brain, giving rise to the question how colour-motion conjunctions are represented. This problem is also known as the ‘binding problem’. Results. Human volunteers viewed visual displays containing coloured dots rotating around the centre. The dots could be red or green, and rotate clockwise or counter-clockwise, leading to four possible stimulus displays. Superimposed pairs of such stimuli provided two additional displays, each containing both colours and both directions of motion, but differing in their feature-conjunctions. We applied multivariate classifiers to voxel activation patterns obtained whilst subjects viewed such displays. Our analyses confirm the presence of directional motion information across visual cortex, and provide evidence of hue coding in all early visual areas except V5/MT+. Within each cortical area, information on colour and motion appeared to be coded in distinct sets of voxels. Furthermore, our results demonstrate the explicit representation of feature conjunctions in primary visual cortex and beyond. Conclusions. The results show that conjunctions can be de-coded from spatial activation patterns already in V1, indicating an explicit coding of conjunctions at early stages of visual processing. Our findings raise the possibility that the solution of what has been taken as the prime example of the binding problem engages neural mechanisms as early as V1.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2009-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2008.12.050
BibTex Citekey: 5627
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Current Biology
  Other : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 19 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 177 - 183 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107