English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The prefrontal cortex accumulates object evidence through differential connectivity to the visual and auditory cortices

Noppeney, U., Ostwald, D., Werner, S., & Kleiner, M. (2008). The prefrontal cortex accumulates object evidence through differential connectivity to the visual and auditory cortices. In 9th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2008) (pp. 118).

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C8AF-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-9085-3
Genre: Meeting Abstract

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Noppeney, U1, 2, Author              
Ostwald, D2, 3, Author              
Werner, S1, 2, Author              
Kleiner, M2, 3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Cognitive Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497804              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
4Project group: Cognitive Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528702              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: To form categorical decisions about objects in our environment, the human brain accumulates noisy sensory information over time till a decisional threshold is reached. Combining fMRI and Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), we investigated how the brain accumulates evidence from the auditory and visual senses through distinct interactions amongst brain regions. In a visual selective attention paradigm, subjects categorized visual action movies while ignoring their accompanying soundtracks that were semantically congruent or incongruent. Both, auditory and visual information could be intact or degraded. Reaction times as a marker for the time to decisional threshold accorded with random walk models of decision making. At the neural level, incongruent auditory sounds induced amplification of the task-relevant visual information in the occipito-temporal cortex. Importantly, only the left inferior frontal sulcus (IFS) showed an activation pattern of an accumulator region i.e. (i) positive reactiontime and (ii) incongruency effects that were increased for unreliable (=degraded) visual and interfering reliable (=intact) auditory information, which -based on our DCM analysis- were mediated by increased forward connectivity from visual regions. Thus, to form interpretations and decisions that guide behavioural responses, the IFS may accumulate multi-sensory evidence over time through dynamic weighting of its connectivity to auditory and visual regions.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2008-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 5264
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: 9th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2008)
Place of Event: Hamburg, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2008-07-16 - 2008-07-19

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: 9th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2008)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 189 Start / End Page: 118 Identifier: -