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  Humans use stereo and haptic distance cues to improve physical object size estimates

Battaglia, P., Ernst, M., Schrater, P., Di Luca, M., Machulla, T., & Kersten, D. (2008). Humans use stereo and haptic distance cues to improve physical object size estimates. Poster presented at 8th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2008), Naples, FL, USA.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C927-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-914A-6
Genre: Poster

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Battaglia, P, Author              
Ernst, M1, 2, Author              
Schrater, P, Author
Di Luca, M1, 2, Author              
Machulla, T1, 2, Author              
Kersten, D, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497806              

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 Abstract: An object's visual image size is an ambiguous cue to its physical size. But if the object's distance is known, the physical size may be disambiguated and more accurately estimated. We asked whether humans use distance cues to improve size judgments. We presented participants with a virtual ball that changed in physical size (imagine a balloon inflating or deflating) as well as distance simultaneously, and asked them to discriminate whether the physical size increased or decreased. With only visual image size information, size-change discrimination was poor. When additional haptic and/or stereo distance-change cues were provided, size-change judgments improved significantly. We conclude that the brain exploits its knowledge of how image size, physical size, and distance are related to improve perceptual size judgments. We compared participants' use of distance cues with predictions of an ideal observer that incorporates distance cues in proportion to their reliability to quantify human behavior. We independently measured participants' stereo and haptic distance discrimination performance, applied these empirical reliability measurements in the ideal model, and found participants use stereo information to a similar degree as the ideal observer, but use haptic information less than the ideal observer. This result was confirmed by an additional conflict condition in which haptic and stereo distance-change cues indicated different values and their relative use could be measured. Lastly, we ran a condition in which participants gripped the object with two fingers, so that a direct size-change cue was available, and found participants integrated direct and indirect size-change cues to improve performance.

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 Dates: 2008-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1167/8.6.1090
BibTex Citekey: 5172
 Degree: -

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Title: 8th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2008)
Place of Event: Naples, FL, USA
Start-/End Date: 2008-05-09 - 2008-05-14

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Title: Journal of Vision
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Charlottesville, VA : Scholar One, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1090 Identifier: ISSN: 1534-7362
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111061245811050