English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cortical Connectivity in vivo

Canals, S., Beyerlein, M., Keller, A., Murayama, Y., & Logothetis, N. (2008). Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cortical Connectivity in vivo. NeuroImage, 40(2), 458-472. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.12.007.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-C9C9-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-310F-6
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Canals, S1, 2, Author              
Beyerlein, M1, 2, Author              
Keller, AL1, 2, Author              
Murayama, Y1, 2, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Magnetic resonance imaging of neuronal connectivity in vivo opens up the possibility of performing longitudinal investigations on neuronal networks. This is one main reason for the attention that paramagnetic ion manganese (Mn2+) has attracted as a potential anterograde neuronal tracer for MRI experiments. However, the correct and possibly repeated use of this tracer – or of any tracer for that matter, including heavy metals – requires the development of an administration strategy that minimizes its toxic effects. Here we first investigated the conditions that maximize the tracing efficiency of Mn2+ and preserve viability and tissue architectonics in combined MRI and histology experiments in rats. We demonstrate that most common protocols for neuronal tract tracing using Mn2+ result in large neuronal and glial lesions. The toxicity of manganese is distinct during intracortical injections and blocks the transfer of the tracer. After optimizing the technique, we could show that extensive cortical connectivity maps can be generated, with no sign of neuronal damage. Importantly, preservation of tissue viability improves the efficiency of Mn2+ in tracing neuronal connections. We have successfully used this technique to trace corticofugal somatosensory and motor pathways in individual animals and describe a connectivity index (CnI) based on Mn2+ transport that quantitatively reveals cortical heterogeneities in interhemispheric communication. Finally, we have significantly improved the resolution of the technique by continuously infusing very low concentrations of Mn2+ into the target area using osmotic pumps coupled to chronically implanted brain cannulae. The specific, nontoxic and quantitative nature of the neuronal tracings described here indicates the value of this tracer for chronic studies of development and plasticity as well as for studies of brain pathology.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2008-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.12.007
BibTex Citekey: 4894
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 40 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 458 - 472 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166