English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Brain-Computer Interfaces for Communication in Paralysis: A Clinical Experimental Approach

Hinterberger, T., Nijboer, F., Kübler, A., Matuz, T., Furdea, A., Mochty, U., et al. (2007). Brain-Computer Interfaces for Communication in Paralysis: A Clinical Experimental Approach. In G. Dornhege, J. Millán, T. Hinterberger, D. McFarland, & K.-R. Müller (Eds.), Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing (pp. 43-64). Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CBFD-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-E8E1-9
Genre: Book Chapter

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
TowardBrainComputerInterfacing-Hinterberger.pdf (Any fulltext), 766KB
Name:
TowardBrainComputerInterfacing-Hinterberger.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Hinterberger, T, Author
Nijboer, F, Author
Kübler, A, Author
Matuz, T, Author
Furdea, A, Author
Mochty, U, Author
Jordan, M, Author
Lal, TN1, 2, Author              
Hill, J1, 2, Author              
Meilinger, J, Author
Bensch, M, Author
Tangermann, M, Author
Widman, G, Author
Elger, CE, Author
Rosenstiel, W, Author
Schölkopf, B1, 2, Author              
Birbaumer, N, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497795              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: An overview of different approaches to brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) developed in our laboratory is given. An important clinical application of BCIs is to enable communication or environmental control in severely paralyzed patients. The BCI “Thought-Translation Device (TTD)” allows verbal communication through the voluntary self-regulation of brain signals (e.g., slow cortical potentials (SCPs)), which is achieved by operant feedback training. Humans' ability to self-regulate their SCPs is used to move a cursor toward a target that contains a selectable letter set. Two different approaches were followed to developWeb browsers that could be controlled with binary brain responses. Implementing more powerful classification methods including different signal parameters such as oscillatory features improved our BCI considerably. It was also tested on signals with implanted electrodes. Most BCIs provide the user with a visual feedback interface. Visually impaired patients require an auditory feedback mode. A procedure using auditory (sonified) feedback of multiple EEG parameters was evaluated. Properties of the auditory systems are reported and the results of two experiments with auditory feedback are presented. Clinical data of eight ALS patients demonstrated that all patients were able to acquire efficient brain control of one of the three available BCI systems (SCP, µ-rhythm, and P300), most of them used the SCP-BCI. A controlled comparison of the three systems in a group of ALS patients, however, showed that P300-BCI and the µ-BCI are faster and more easily acquired than SCP-BCI, at least in patients with some rudimentary motor control left. Six patients who started BCI training after entering the completely locked-in state did not achieve reliable communication skills with any BCI system. One completely locked-in patient was able to communicate shortly with a ph-meter, but lost control afterward.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2007-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 4942
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing
Source Genre: Book
 Creator(s):
Dornhege, G, Editor
Millán , JR, Editor
Hinterberger, T, Editor
McFarland, DJ, Editor
Müller, K-R1, Editor            
Affiliations:
1 External Organizations, ou_persistent22            
Publ. Info: Cambridge, MA, USA : MIT Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 43 - 64 Identifier: ISBN: 0-262-04244-4

Source 2

show
hide
Title: Neural Information Processing Series
Source Genre: Series
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: -