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  Physical self-motion facilitates object recognition, but does not enable view-independence

Teramoto, W., & Riecke, B. (2007). Physical self-motion facilitates object recognition, but does not enable view-independence. Poster presented at 4th Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization (APGV 2007), Tübingen, Germany.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CCC5-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-E156-E
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Teramoto, W1, 2, Author              
Riecke, BE1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: It is well known that people have difficulties in recognizing an object from novel views as compared to learned views, resulting in increased response times and/or errors. This so-called view-dependency has been confirmed by many studies. In the natural environment, however, there are two ways of changing views of an object: one is to rotate an object in front of a stationary observer (object-movement), the other is for the observer to move around a stationary object (observer-movement). Note that almost all previous studies are based on the former procedure. Simons et al. [2002] criticized previous studies in this regard and examined the difference between object- and observer-movement directly. As a result, Simons et al. [2002] reported the elimination of this view-dependency when novel views resulted from observer-movement, instead of object-movement. They suggest the contribution of extra-retinal (vestibular and proprioceptive) information to object recognition. Recently, however, Zhao et al. [2007] repor ted that the observeramp;amp;lsquo;s movement from one view to another only decreased view-dependency without fully eliminating it. Furthermore, even this effect vanished for rotations of 90° instead of 50°. Larger rotations were not tested. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon and to investigate larger angles of view change (45-180°, in 45° steps).

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 Dates: 2007-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1145/1272582.1272619
BibTex Citekey: 4654
 Degree: -

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Title: 4th Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization (APGV 2007)
Place of Event: Tübingen, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2007-07-25 - 2007-07-27

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Title: APGV '07: 4th Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Wallraven, C1, Editor            
Sundstedt, V, Editor
Affiliations:
1 Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797            
Publ. Info: New York, NY, USA : ACM Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 142 Identifier: ISBN: 978-1-59593-670-7