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  Head-Trunk Relation Before and During a Turn: the Effect of Turn Angle

Sreenivasa, M., Frissen, I., Souman, J., & Ernst, M. (2007). Head-Trunk Relation Before and During a Turn: the Effect of Turn Angle. Poster presented at 10th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2007), Tübingen, Germany.

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 Creators:
Sreenivasa, M1, 2, 3, Author              
Frissen, I1, 2, 3, Author              
Souman, JL1, 2, 3, Author              
Ernst, MO2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497806              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: During walking the behavior of the head and trunk are closely coupled. This becomes particularly clear while taking a turn. Here, we investigate this coupling during two phases of turning, before and during. Before a turn people make anticipatory orientations of the head into the direction of the turn. Previous research suggests that this anticipation occurs at a constant distance before the curve for different walking speeds. However, in most studies participants only performed 90 turns. We tested whether anticipation distance is invariant across different turn angles. As the turn progresses the head continues to look further into the turn than the trunk, and slowly converging towards the end of turn. An additional question here is the dependence of relative yaw between head and trunk on the turn angle. To answer these questions we measured head-trunk angles across a range of different turn angles. Participants followed predefined paths around obstacles with the radius of turn indicated by circles drawn on the floor. Turning angles ranged from 45 to 180 in steps of 45. The position and orientation of both the head and trunk were measured using an optical tracking system. Two parameters were calculated from the data: head anticipation and maximum relative yaw. Head anticipation is the distance in space where the head starts to look into the upcoming turn. Maximum relative yaw is the maximum difference occurring between the yaw angle of the head and the trunk during a turn. Both head anticipation and maximum relative yaw increased with turn angle, although maximum relative yaw leveled off after 135. In a second experiment, participants followed the same paths as in Experiment 1, but were not constrained in the turn radius. Results showed that turn radius decreased with increasing turn angle. Nevertheless, we found the same pattern of results as in Experiment 1. In conclusion, the relation between head and trunk both before and during a turn is dependent on the angle of turn one is about to make.

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 Dates: 2007-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 4568
 Degree: -

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Title: 10th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2007)
Place of Event: Tübingen, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2007-07-27 - 2007-07-29

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Title: 10th Tübinger Perception Conference: TWK 2007
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Bülthoff, HH1, Editor            
Chatziastros, A1, Editor            
Mallot, HA, Editor            
Ulrich, R, Editor
Affiliations:
1 Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797            
Publ. Info: Kirchentellinsfurt, Germany : Knirsch
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 79 Identifier: ISBN: 3-927091-77-4