English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Using the Local Field Potential (LFP) Recorded from the Inferior-Temporal Cortex of a Macaque Monkey to Study Species-Dependent (Monkey/human) Face Processing

Sigala, R., Veit, J., Logothetis, N., & Rainer, G. (2007). Using the Local Field Potential (LFP) Recorded from the Inferior-Temporal Cortex of a Macaque Monkey to Study Species-Dependent (Monkey/human) Face Processing. Poster presented at 10th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2007), Tübingen, Germany.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Sigala, R1, 2, Author              
Veit, J1, 2, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Rainer, G1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Recently, we have been able to read out a human/monkey face category-boundary from singleunit-activity (SUA) recorded from the inferior-temporal (IT) cortex of a macaque monkey brain. This data was collected in an experiment where monkeys have to fixate at pictures of human/monkey morphed faces at different levels of this ‘species-continuum’. Consistent with our previous psychophysical experiments in which human subjects have to categorize morphed faces as humans or monkeys, the perceptual boundary seems to be shifted towards the ‘own-species’ category (approximately 60 human/40 monkey in humans and the other way around in the monkey data). Similar to the ‘other-race’ effect, this effect suggests a perceptual bias that could be due to long-term learning. The local field potential (LFP) refers to the low-frequency (< 300Hz) component of signals recorded from the brain, and it has been associated with dendritic activity within a particular recording area. In this work we investigate to what extent these LFP signals are stimulus selective and weather they correlate with our previous results obtained from the simultaneously recorded spiking activity (SUA).To achieve that, we first extract different features from the LFP signals such peak amplitude, time-onset or the spectral power of different frequency bands. To evaluate the information content of these features in relation to our stimulus and the spiking data, we use statistical analyses, information theory and pattern classification. Preliminary results show that features such as peak onset-time and peak-amplitude differ significantly across stimulus-conditions. In contrast to the spiking data, when using these features, the pattern classifiers set the face category-border without a consistent shift towards the monkey category. Further analysis of these features using information theory will be needed to test possible correlations with the spiking data and the stimulus properties.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2007-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: 4886
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: 10th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2007)
Place of Event: Tübingen, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2007-07-27 - 2007-07-29

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: 10th Tübinger Perception Conference: TWK 2007
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Bülthoff, HH1, Editor            
Chatziastros, A1, Editor            
Mallot, HA, Editor            
Ulrich, R, Editor
Affiliations:
1 Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797            
Publ. Info: Kirchentellinsfurt, Germany : Knirsch
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 117 Identifier: ISBN: 3-927091-77-4