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  Simulating believable forward accelerations on a Stewart motion platform

Berger, D., Schulte-Pelkum, J., & Bülthoff, H.(2007). Simulating believable forward accelerations on a Stewart motion platform (159). Tübingen, Germany: Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CEC1-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-87B4-A
Genre: Report

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MPIK-TR-159.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
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Berger, D1, 2, Author              
Schulte-Pelkum, J1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
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1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Here we present a study where human participants rated the believability of forward accelerations simulated with a hexapod motion platform equipped with a projection screen. Visual forward accelerations were presented together with brief forward surge translations and backwards pitches of the platform, and synchronous random up-down movements of the camera in the visual scene and the platform. The magnitudes of all of the parameters were varied independently across trials. Even though we found a high variability between participants, most believable simulation occured with strong visual accelerations combined with backwards pitches of the platform which approximately matched the visually simulated acceleration. This was contrary to a previous study, which had found most believable simulation when the platform movements simulated a much smaller acceleration than what was shown visually. Furthermore, surge translations increased believability if they qualitatively matched the magnitude of visual acceleration. The acceleration-deceleration profile of the surge translation and the magnitude and frequency range of the up-down movements had little effect on the believability. When strong visual acceleration cues were given, most participants reported trials as realistic even when the platform tilt rate was above thresholds for the vestibular canals reported in literature. These results can be used to optimize motion cueing algorithms for the simulation of linear accelerations in motion simulators.

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 Dates: 2007-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 19
 Publishing info: Tübingen, Germany : Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: Report Nr.: 159
BibTex Citekey: 4373
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Title: Technical Report of the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 159 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: -