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  Simple User-Generated Motion Cueing can Enhance Self-Motion Perception (Vection) in Virtual Reality

Riecke, B. (2006). Simple User-Generated Motion Cueing can Enhance Self-Motion Perception (Vection) in Virtual Reality. In M. Slater, Y. Kitamura, A. Tal, A. Amditis, & Y. Chrysanthou (Eds.), VRST '06: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology (pp. 104-107). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-CF8F-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-96D2-5
Genre: Conference Paper

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 Creators:
Riecke, BE1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Despite amazing advances in the visual quality of virtual environ-ments, affordable-yet-effective self-motion simulation still poses a major challenge. Using a standard psychophysical paradigm, the effectiveness of different self-motion simulations was quantified in terms of the onset latency, intensity, and convincingness of the per-ceived illusory self motion (vection). Participants were asked to actively follow different pre-defined trajectories through a naturalistic virtual scene presented on a panoramic projection screen using three different input devices: a computer mouse, a joystick, or a modified manual wheelchair. For the wheelchair, participants exerted their own minimal motion cueing using a simple force-feedback and a velocity control paradigm: small translational or rotational motions of the wheelchair (limited to 8cm and 10°, re-spectively) initiated a corresponding visual motion with the visual velocity being proportional to the wheelchair deflection (similar to a joystick). All dependent measures showed a clear enhancement of the perceived self-motion when the wheelchair was used instead of the mouse or joystick. Compared to more traditional approaches of enhancing self-motion perception (e.g., motion platforms, free walking areas, or treadmills) the current approach of using a simple user-generated motion cueing has only minimal requirements in terms of overall costs, required space, safety features, and technical effort and expertise. Thus, the current approach might be promising for a wide range of low-cost applications.

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 Dates: 2006-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1145/1180495.1180517
BibTex Citekey: 4063
 Degree: -

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Title: ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology (VRST 2006)
Place of Event: Limassol, Cyprus
Start-/End Date: 2006-11-01 - 2006-11-03

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Title: VRST '06: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Slater, M, Editor
Kitamura, Y, Editor
Tal, A, Editor
Amditis, A, Editor
Chrysanthou, Y, Editor
Affiliations:
-
Publ. Info: New York, NY, USA : ACM Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 104 - 107 Identifier: ISBN: 1-59593-321-2