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  Using 3-D human-monkey morphs to explore the boundaries of species dependent face-categories in humans

Sigala, R., Koch, A., Nielsen, K., Logothetis, N., & Rainer, G. (2006). Using 3-D human-monkey morphs to explore the boundaries of species dependent face-categories in humans. Poster presented at 29th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2006), St. Petersburg, Russia.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-D0BB-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-B666-C
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Sigala, R1, 2, Author              
Koch, A, Author
Nielsen, KJ1, 2, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Rainer, G1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Face perception has often been investigated with human faces differing in categories such as race or gender. Here, we investigate the perceptual border across species. We applied a method based on support vector machines to generate images of hybrid monkey - human faces (‘morphs‘) with different levels of human contribution. In the ‘explicit‘ experiment, we asked subjects to rate morphs at different morph levels as ‘humans‘ or ‘monkeys‘. We found that subjects rated the morphs as humans when they had a human contribution of at least 56±3. In the ‘implicit‘ experiment, we asked whether subjects could distinguish between successively presented morphs differing by ±10 morph level from a morph centre. By varying the morph centre value from 10 to 90, we were able to measure subjectlsqu o;s sensitivity to detect species differences along the human - monkey continuum. We found that the sensitivity of subjects to detect species differences was highest when morphs had a human contribution of 65±3. In summary, the human - monkey boundary does not lie at the midpoint of the human - monkey continuum, but tends to be shifted towards the human side. Our results reveal an asymmetry in the perception of human - monkey morphed faces, which may be species-specific and/or due to expertise.

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 Dates: 2006-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/03010066060350S101
BibTex Citekey: 5551
 Degree: -

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Title: 29th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2006)
Place of Event: St. Petersburg, Russia
Start-/End Date: 2006-08-20 - 2006-08-26

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Title: Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Pion Ltd.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 35 (ECVP Abstract Supplement) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 207 - 208 Identifier: ISSN: 0301-0066
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925509369